We headed down to Ricketts Point early in the morning to have another look at the amazing aggregation that we'd seen over the last couple of weeks. For a while it looked like we weren't going to be able to get to the disve site, as a triathlon was being run along Beach Road, and initially we thought that we weren't going to be allowed through. It turned out that we were there early enough for us to get to the yacht club cart park, with our hazard lights on.

We arrived just in time to see a series of large waves break over the reed. This went on for around 10 minutes, although there was no swell, and absolutely no wind. We were there just on high tide, so perhaps it was a tidal bore of some sort. These unusual waves and the pink/orange light reflecting off the water combined to give the place a surreal feel.

The water was quite murky in spots, but there was lots of life. We saw many large Scalyfins protecting territory, a few Banjo Sharks, quite a few Dusky Morwong, Leatherjackets, Flathead, and Old Wives, and the biggest aggregation of Snapper and Zebrafish that we have seen to date! A few Pygmy Leatherjackets were also spotted in the shallows, and we also saw a number of Gobbleguts hiding in caves and under ledges.

The masses of fish surpassed anything that I have seen in an aquarium, and it is amazing to think that this is just a few kilometres from Melbourne's CBD!

About 9 pm, incoming SS Penola ( 500 tons) struck and ran down City of Launceston which began to settle almost immediately. Passengers and crew transferred with difficulty to Penola. Sunken vessel valued at about 17,000 pounds - not insured. Sold by auction to Barrett, engineer of City of Launceston, who sold to a syndicate but salvage attempts eventually abandoned. Victorian Steam Navigation Board Inquiry held City of Launceston to blame for accident. Two separate Supreme Court actions by the respective owners for damages found in favour of the plaintiff in each case! An appeal by the aggrieved owner of the Penola for a non suit or a new trial was ultimately refused. Eleutheria, lighter, exhibited light at wreck site until it too sank. City of Launceston was the first shipwreck to be declared an Historic Shipwreck under new Victorian legislation. Built for the Melbourne to Launceston Bass Strait run, it was a regular trader across Bass Strait. - See more at: http://vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/shipwrecks/124#sthash.aPC0R645.dpuf
About 9 pm, incoming SS Penola ( 500 tons) struck and ran down City of Launceston which began to settle almost immediately. Passengers and crew transferred with difficulty to Penola. Sunken vessel valued at about 17,000 pounds - not insured. Sold by auction to Barrett, engineer of City of Launceston, who sold to a syndicate but salvage attempts eventually abandoned. Victorian Steam Navigation Board Inquiry held City of Launceston to blame for accident. Two separate Supreme Court actions by the respective owners for damages found in favour of the plaintiff in each case! An appeal by the aggrieved owner of the Penola for a non suit or a new trial was ultimately refused. Eleutheria, lighter, exhibited light at wreck site until it too sank. City of Launceston was the first shipwreck to be declared an Historic Shipwreck under new Victorian legislation. Built for the Melbourne to Launceston Bass Strait run, it was a regular trader across Bass Strait. - See more at: http://vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/shipwrecks/124#sthash.aPC0R645.dpuf

Divers: Kirsty Batchelor, Peter Batchelor

Weather/Sea: Calm.
Visibility: 3-5 metres.
Water temperature: 19°C.
Maximum depth: 4.9 metres.
Time of entry: 08:10
Duration: 104 minutes.

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